Axarquia Animal Rescue

Taking care of abandoned & abused animals

Plants Toxic To Pets And Livestock

Extremely toxic and even lethal to cats, dogs, horses, rabbits, and birds, the Avocado's toxicity is often overlookedOur pets and livestock enjoy all that the outdoors has to offer. They dream of long walks, lazing about, grazing, car rides, and playing ball. What they don't dream of is the potential of being inadvertantly poisoned while enjoying their escapades. This makes it very important for us, their humans, to be aware of plants and flowers, that although beautiful, can seriously injure of even kill them. Some of the plants listed below as toxic may surprise you, some you may already be aware of, and some you may never have heard of. It is not a comprehensive list by any means, and would be exhausting to look over without the categories I have provided. All plants are listed alphabetically and under their prospective category as to which animal/s can be effected. Please take some time to read about the plants that may effect your dog, cat, horse, rabbit, livestock, etc. It may just save their lives and a lot of heartache. If your animal/s are ever exposed to these plants and ingest even a small amount it is extremely important that you get them to a veterinarian immediately. Some of them are lethal and others can cause crippling pain or profound discomfort.

PLANTS TOXIC TO DOGS, CATS AND HORSES:
Adam-and-Eve: Also called Arum, Lord-and-Ladies, Wake Robin, Starch Root, Bobbins, Cuckoo Plant. Signs of ingestion include: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
African Wonder Tree: Ricin is what makes this plant toxic and ingesting as much as one ounce of seeds can be lethal. Signs typically develop 12 to 48 hours after ingestion, and include loss of appetite, excessive thirst, weakness, colic, trembling, sweating, loss of coordination, difficulty breathing, progressive central nervous system depression, and fever. As syndrome progresses, bloody diarrhea may occur, and convulsions and coma can precede death.
Alocasia: Also called Elephant's Ear, ingestion of this plant can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Ambrosia Mexicana: Also called Jerusalem Oak or Feather Geranium, Ingestion signs include vomiting, anorexia, and depression.
American Bittersweet: Also known as Bittersweet, Waxwork, Shrubby Bittersweet, False Bittersweet, and Climbing Bittersweet, ingestion of this plant can cause weakness, convulsions, and gastroenteritis (vomiting, diarrhea).
American Holly: Also called English Holly, European Holly, Oregon Holly, Inkberry, or Winterberry, its' leaves and berries have a low toxicity level but signs of ingestion are vomiting, diarrhea and depression.
American Mandrake: Also called Mayapple, Indian Apple Root, Umbrella Leaf, Wild Lemon, Hog Apple, Duck's Foot, or Raccoonberry, signs of ingestion are vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, panting, coma (rare), dermal – redness, and skin ulcers.
American Mistletoe: Gastrointestinal disorders, cardiovascular collapse, dyspnea, bradycardia, erratic behavior, vomiting, diarrhea, and low blood pressure (rare) can occur from ingesting this plant.
American Yew: Tremors, difficulty breathing, vomiting, seizures (in dogs), or sudden death from acute heart failure are signs this plant has been ingested.
Angelica Tree: Also called Hercules' Club, Devil's Walking Stick, Prickly Ash, or Prickly Elder, ingestion of this plant can cause skin and oral irritation, hypersalivation, vomiting, and diarrhea.
Apple (including the Crab Apple): This plants stems, leaves, and seeds contain cyanide, especially when it is wilting. Brick red mucous membranes, dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, panting, and shock are signs of ingestion.
Apricot (Group also includes Plum, Peach, and Cherry): The stems, leaves, and seeds of these plants contain cyanide, especially while they are wilting. Signs they have been eaten are brick red mucous membranes, dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, panting, and shock.
Arum: Also called Cuckoo-pint, Lord-and-Ladies, Adam-and-Eve, Starch Root, Bobbins, or Wake Robin, ingestion of this plant can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Autumn Crocus: Also called Meadow Saffron, ingesting this plant can cause oral irritation, bloody vomiting, diarrhea, shock, multi-organ damage, and bone marrow suppression.
Avocado: Known also as the Alligator Pear, the leaves, bark, seeds, and fruit of this plant are all toxic. With horses poisoning can occur when there is an avocado grove used as a pasture or the animal has access to pruned branches. Effects of poisoning tend to mainly occur in mares and include noninfectious mastitis, as well as occasional gastritis and colic. In dogs and cats vomiting and diarrhea can occur.
Azalea: Also called Rosebay or Rhododendron, even the ingestion of a few leaves of this plant can cause serious problems such as vomiting, diarrhea, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, hypotension, CNS depression, cardiovascular collapse and death. The plant is typically not very palatable to horses unless it is the only forage available, but sheep and goats may graze readily on it. The Grayantoxin found in the plant interferes with normal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and nerve function. Effects typically occur within a few hours after ingestion, and can include acute digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements/diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate and recumbency for 2 or more days; at this point, improvement may be seen or the animal may become comatose and die.
Bead Tree: Ingestion of this plant can cause diarrhea, vomiting, salivation, depression, weakness, and seizures. The berries are the most toxic but the bark, leaves, and flowers are toxic as well.
Bergamot Orange: Known also as Bergamot or Citrus bergamia, ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, depression and potential photosensitivity.
Bird of Paradise Flower: Also called the Crane Flower or Bird's Tongue Flower this plant can cause mild nausea, vomiting, and drowsiness. Mainly the fruit and seeds are toxic. This plant should not be confused with Caesalpinia or Poinciana gilliesii, which is also known as Bird of Paradise and is more toxic.
Bishop's Weed: Known also as the Greater Ammi or False Queen Anne's Lace, ingesting this plant can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Bitter Root: Also called Dogbane Hemp or Indian Hemp, this plant can cause diarrhea (with the possibility of blood), slow heart rate and weakness.
Black Calla: Known also as Solomon's Lily, Wild Calla, or Wild Arum can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Black Laurel: Also called Dog Hobble, Dog Laurel, Fetter Bush, or Sierra Laurel, ingesting this plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, depression, cardiovascular collapse, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, low blood pressure, and death. Ingesting even a few leaves can cause serious problems.
Black Nightshade: Known also as Nightshade or Deadly Nightshade, signs of poisoning include hypersalivation, inappetence, severe gastrointestinal upset, diarrhea, drowsiness, CNS depression, confusion, behavioral change, weakness, dilated pupils, and slow heart rate.
Bobbins: Also called Arum, Lord-and-Ladies, Adam-and-Eve, Starch Root, Wake Robin, or Cuckoo Plant, ingesting this plant can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Boxwood: Ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea in dogs and cats and colic, diarrhea, respiratory failure, seizures in horses.
Branching Ivy: Also called English Ivy, Glacier Ivy, Needlepoint Ivy, Sweetheart Ivy, or California Ivy, signs of ingestion include vomiting, abdominal pain, hypersalivation, and diarrhea. The foliage of this plant is more toxic than the berries.
Bread And Butter Plant: Known also as Indian Borage, Spanish Thyme, Coleus, Maratha, Militini, or East Indian Thyme, ingesting this plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, depression, anorexia, and occasionally bloody diarrhea or vomiting.
Brunfelsia: Also called Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow, Kiss-Me-Quick, Lady-of-the-Night, or Fransiscan Rain Tree, ingestion of this plant can cause tremors, seizures (for several days), diarrhea, vomiting, hypersalivation, lethargy, incoordination, and coughing.
Buckeye: Known also as Horse Chestnut, ingestion can cause severe vomiting and diarrhea, depression or excitement, dilated pupils, coma, convulsions, and wobbliness.
Buckwheat: The main toxin in this plant causes photosensitization (ulcerative and exudative dermatitis).
Buddhist Pine: Also called the Yew Pine, Japanese Yew, Southern Yew, or Podocarpus ,ingestion of it can cause severe vomiting and diarrhea.
Burning Bush: Also known as the Wahoo or Spindle Tree, ingesting this plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, weakness and heart rhythm abnormalities with large doses.
Buttercup: Also known as Butter Cress or Figwort, ingestion causes vomiting, diarrhea, depression, anorexia, hypersalivation and a wobbly gait.

Calamondin Orange: Ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, depression and potential photosensitivity.
Cape Jasmine: Known also as Gardenia, ingestion of this plant can cause mild vomiting and/or diarrhea, and hives.
Cardboard Palm: Also called Cycads or Zamias, ingesting this plant can cause vomiting, melena, icterus, increased thirst, hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, bruising, coagulopathy, liver damage, liver failure, and death.
Cardinal Flower: Also known as Lobelia or Indian Pink, its' ingestion can cause depression, diarrhea, vomiting, excessive salivation, abdominal pain, and heart rhythm disturbances.
Castor Bean Plant: Also called Castor Oil Plant, Mole Bean Plant, African Wonder Tree, or Castor Bean, ingesting the beans of this plant can cause oral irritation, burning of mouth and throat, increase in thirst, vomiting, diarrhea, kidney failure, and convulsions. The main toxin in this plant inhibits protein synthesis and ingesting as little as one ounce of seeds can be lethal. Signs typically develop 12 to 48 hours after ingestion, and include loss of appetite, excessive thirst, weakness, colic, trembling, sweating, loss of coordination, difficulty breathing, progressive central nervous system depression, and fever. As the syndrome progresses, bloody diarrhea may occur, and convulsions and coma can precede death.
Cherry: The stems, leaves, and seeds of the cherry contain cyanide and are particularly toxic while in the process of wilting. Ingestion can cause brick red mucous membranes, dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, panting, and shock.
Chinaberry Tree: Also called Bead Tree, China Ball Tree, Paradise Tree, Persian Lilac, White Cedar, Japanese Bead Tree, Texas Umbrella Tree, or Pride-of-India, ingestion of this plant can cause diarrhea, vomiting, salivation, depression, weakness, and seizures. Ripe fruit (berries) is the most toxic part of the plant but the bark, leaves, and flowers are also toxic.
Chinese Evergreen: Signs this plant has been ingested include oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Christmas Rose: Known also as Hellebore, Lenten Rose or Easter Rose, signs of ingestion include rooling, abdominal pain and diarrhea, colic, and depression.
Chrysanthemum: Also called the Daisy or Mum, signs of ingestion include vomiting, diarrhea, hypersalivation, incoordination, and dermatitis.
Clematis: Also called Virgin’s Bower or Leatherflower, ingesting this plant can cause salivation, vomiting, and diarrhea.
Climbing Bittersweet: Known also as Bittersweet, Waxwork, Shrubby Bittersweet, False Bittersweet, or American Bittersweet, ingestion of this plant can cause weakness, convulsions, and gastroenteritis.
Climbing Nightshade: Also known as European Bittersweet, Deadly Nightshade, Violet Bloom, Blue Nightshade, Soda Apple, Poisonous Nightshade, Felonwort, Devil's Apple, Scarlet Berry, Woody Nightshade, or Blue Blindweed, signs this plant has been ingested include vomiting and diarrhea which are common, as well as drowsiness, low blood pressure, and low heart rate, which are uncommon.
Coffee Tree: Known also as Wild Coffee or Geranium-Leaf Aralia, ingestion of this plant can cause contact dermatitis, vomiting, anorexia, and depression.
Coleus: Also called Indian Borage, Bread and Butter Plant, Spanish Thyme, East Indian Thyme, Stinging Thyme or Country Boarage, ingesting this plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, depression, anorexia, and occasionally bloody diarrhea or vomiting.
Common Privet: Known also as Privet, Amur or Wax-leaf, ingestion of this plant can cause gastrointestinal upset which is themost common symptom. Rarely it can cause incoordination, increased heart rate, and death.
Coontie Palm: Also called the Sago Palm or Cardboard Palm, signs of its' ingestion include vomiting, melena, icterus, increased thirst, hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, bruising, coagulopathy, liver damage, liver failure, and death.
Cow parsnip: Also known as Giant Hogweed, photosensitization (ulcerative and exudative dermatitis) and ocular toxicity can occur if this plant is ingested.
Cowbane: Known also as Water Hemlock or Poison Parsnip, diarrhea, seizures, tremors, extreme stomach pain, dilated pupils, fever, bloat, respiratory depression, and death can occur if this plant is eaten.
Cycads: Also called the Sago Palm or Fern Palm, signs of it's ingestion include vomiting (may be bloody), dark stools, jaundice, increased thirst, bloody diarrhea, bruising, liver failure, and death. Even one or two seeds can be fatal.
Daffodil: Also called Narcissus, Jonquil, or Paper White, signs of its' ingestion include vomiting, salvation, and diarrhea. If a large amount is ingested convulsions, low blood pressure, tremors and cardiac arrhythmias can occur. Bulbs are the most poisonous part of this plant.
Desert Azalea: Also called Desert Rose, Mock Azalea, Sabi Star, Impala Lily or Kudu Lily, ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, depression, irregular heart beat, and death.
Dock: Also called Sorrel, ingestion of this plant can cause kidney failure, tremors, and salivation.
Dog Daisy: Also known as Dog Fennel, ingestion of this plant can cause increased urination, vomiting, diarrhea, and dermatitis.
Dog Hobble: Known also as Dog Laurel, Fetter Bush and Black Laurel, it's ingestion can cause vomiting, diarrhea, depression, cardiovascular collapse, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, low blood pressure, and death. Ingesting even a few leaves can cause serious problems.
Dogbane Hemp: Also called Bitterroot or Indian Hemp, signs of ingestion include diarrhea (possibly with blood), slow heart rate, and weakness.
Emerald Fern: Also known as Asparagus, Asparagus fern, Sprengeri fern, Plumosa fern, Lace fern, Racemose asparagus or Shatavari, ingestion of this plant can cause allergic dermatitis with repeated dermal exposure. Ingestion of its' berries can cause gastric upset.
English Holly: Also called the European Holly, Oregon Holly, Inkberry, Winterberry or American Holly, it's ingestion can cause vomiting, diarrhea and depression. The leaves and berries have a low toxicity.
English Yew: Known also as Western Yew, Pacific Yew, Japanese Yew or Anglo-Japanese Yew, signs of ingestion include tremors, difficulty breathing, vomiting, seizures (in dogs), and sudden death from acute heart failure.
Eucalyptus: Salivation, vomiting, diarrhea, depression, and weakness can occur if this plant is ingested.
Everlasting Pea: Also called Sweet Pea or Perennial Pea, signs of ingestion include weakness, lethargy, pacing, head pressing, tremors, seizures and possibly death.
Fig: Also known as Weeping Fig, or Indian Rubber Plant, contact with the skin can cause dermatitis while ingestion can cause oral irritation, salivation and vomiting.
Fleabane: Also called Showy Daisy, Horseweed or Seaside Daisy, it's ingestion can cause mild vomiting and diarrhea.
Foxglove: Ingestion of this plant can cause cardiac arrhythmias, vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, cardiac failure, and death.
Garlic: Known also as Stinking Rose, Rustic Treacle, Comphor of the Poor, Nectar of the Gods, Serpet Garlic or Rocambole, ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, breakdown of red blood cells (hemolytic anemia, Heinz body anemia), blood in urine, weakness, high heart rate, and panting.
Gladiola: Salivation, vomiting, drooling,lethargy, and diarrhea can occur if this plant is ingested. The most toxic part of the plant are the bulbs.
Gloriosa Lily: Also called Climbing Lily or Superb Lily, its' ingestion can cause salivation, vomiting with blood, diarrhea with blood, shock, kidney failure, liver damage, and bone marrow suppression.
Good Luck Plant: All parts of the plant have toxic potential, although the possibility of serious effects is usually limited to ingestions of large quantities. In horses ingestion can cause colic and kidney failure is possible if significant amounts are eaten.
Grapefruit: Vomiting, diarrhea, depression and potential photosensitivity are all signs this plant has been ingested.
Hashish: Also called Marijuana or Indian Hemp, ingestion can cause prolonged depression, vomiting, incoordination, sleepiness or excitation, hypersalivaton, dilated pupils, low blood pressure, low body temperature, seizure, coma, and death (rare).
Heavenly Bamboo: Also called Sacred Bamboo or Nandina, ingesting this plant can cause weakness, incoordination, seizures, coma, respiratory failure, and death (rare).
Hibiscus: Also known as the Rose of Sharon or Rose of China signs of ingestion include vomiting, diarrhea, nausea, and anorexia.
Hills of Snow: Known also as Hydrangea, Hortensia or Seven Bark, signs of ingestion include vomiting, depression, diarrhea, and cyanide intoxication (rare).
Hosta: Also called Plantain Lily or Funkia, vomiting, diarrhea, and depression can occur if this plant is ingested.
Hyacinth: Ingestion of this plant can cause intense vomiting, diarrhea, occassionally with blood, depression and tremors.
Indian Apple: Known also as Mayapple, Indian Apple Root, Umbrella Leaf, Wild Lemon, Hog Apple, Duck's Foot, Raccoonberry, or American Mandrake, its' ingestion can cause vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, panting, coma (rare), dermal redness, and skin ulcers.
Jack-in-the-pulpit: Also called Three-leaved indian turnip, Devil's dear, Wake robin, Starch wort, Wild turnip, Dragon root, Bog onion, Pepper turnip, Brown dragon or Memory root, signs this plant has been ingested include oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Jerusalem Cherry: Also called Natal cherry or Winter cherry signs of ingestion include gastrointestinal disturbances, possible ulceration of the gastrointestinal system, seizures, depression, respiratory depression, and shock.
Kaffir Lily: Known also as Clivia Lily, signs of ingestion include vomiting, salvation and diarrhea. If large amounts are eaten convulsions, low blood pressure, tremors, and cardiac arrhythmias may occur. The bulbs are the most toxic part of this plant.
Klamath Weed: Known also as St. John's Wort, ingestion can cause photosensitization (ulcerative and exudative dermatitis). Leek: Ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, breakdown of red blood cells (hemolytic anemia, Heinz body anemia), blood in urine, weakness, high heart rate, and panting.
Lemon: Ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, depression and potential photosensitivity.
Lily of the Valley: Vomiting, irregular heart beat, low blood pressure, disorientation, coma, and seizures can occur if this plant is ingested.
Lily-of-the-Valley Bush: Also known as Andromeda Japonica or Pieris, ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, depression, cardiovascular collapse, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, low blood pressure, and death. Ingestion of just a few leaves can cause serious problems.
Lime: Ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, depression and potential photosensitivity.
Locust: Signs of ingestion may develop one to two hours later and include loss of appetite, depression, stupor, weakness with rear end paralysis, laminitis, coldness of the extremities, dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, weak, irregular pulse, and diarrhea (which may be bloody). Primary damage is done to the gastrointestinal tract and long term effects can include chronic laminitis.
Mayweed: Also known as Poison Daisy or Stinking Chamomile, signs this plant has been ingested include contact dermatitis, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, and allergic reactions. Long term ingestion can lead to bleeding tendencies.
Milfoil: Known also as Yarrow, ingesting this plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, depression, anorexia, and hypersalivation.
Milkweed: Vomiting, profound depression, weakness, anorexia, and diarrhea are common with the ingestion of this plant and may be followed by seizures, difficulty breathing, rapid, weak pulse, dilated pupils, kidney or liver failure, coma, respiratory paralysis and death.
Mole Bean Plant: Access to ornamental plants or pruned foliage most common in poisonings. The toxins in this plant inhibit protein synthesis and ingestion of as little as one ounce of seeds can be lethal. Signs typically develop 12 to 48 hours after ingestion and include loss of appetite, excessive thirst, weakness, colic, trembling, sweating, loss of coordination, difficulty breathing, progressive central nervous system depression, and fever. As the syndrome progresses, bloody diarrhea may occur, and convulsions and coma can precede death.
Moss Rose: Also known as Wild Portulaca, Rock Moss, Purslane, Pigwee or Pusley, this plant is highly toxic.

Nicotiana: Also called Tree Tobacco, Tobacco or Mustard Tree, ingestion of this plant can cause hyperexcitability then depression, vomiting, incoordination, paralysis, and possibly death.
Oleander: All parts of this plant are toxic and can cause colic, diarrhea (possibly bloody), sweating, incoordination, shallow/difficult breathing, muscle tremors, recumbency, and possibly death from cardiac failure.
Onion: Ingestion of this plant can cause gastrointestinal upset, hemolytic anemia, heinz Vomiting, breakdown of red blood cells (hemolytic anemia, Heinz body anemia), blood in urine, weakness, high heart rate, and panting. Cats are more sensitive to the toxins in the plant than horses and dogs.
Orange: Ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, depression and potential photosensitivity.
Pencil Cactus: Also known as Crown of Thorns, this plant is irritating to the mouth and stomach and can cause vomiting if ingested.
Peony: Ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and depression.
Periwinkle: Also called Running Myrtle or Vinca, this plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, low blood pressure, depression, tremors, seizures, coma, and death if ingested.
Pie Plant: Known also as Rhubarb signs this plant can cause kidney failure, tremors, and salivation.
Plum: The stems, leaves, and seeds or this plant are toxic, especially while wilting. Signs it has been ingested include brick red mucous membranes, dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, panting, and shock.
Poison Hemlock: Also known as Poison Parsley, Spotted Hemlock, Winter Fern, California Fern, Nebraska Fern or Deadly Hemlock, its' toxicity depends on its' stage of maturity, reproduction and climate. As it dries out the so do the toxins that if ingested can cause central nervous excitation, muscle tremors, incoordination, excessive salivation, frequent bowel movements and urination, abdominal pain, and an increased respiratory rate. As the syndrome proceeds weakness can turn into muscular paralysis and death is possible due to respiratory paralysis.
Prayer Bean: Also called Rosary Pea, Buddhist rosary bead, Indian Bead, Indian Licorice, Love Bean, Lucky Bean, Seminole Bead or Weather Plant, ingestion of it can cause severe vomiting and diarrhea (sometimes bloody), tremors, high heart rate, fever, shock, and death. If the seed coat is broken, the seeds of this plant are very toxic.
Primrose: If this plant is ingested mild vomiting can occur.
Ranger's Button: Also called White Heads, ingestion of this plant can cause photosensitization (ulcerative and exudative dermatitis) and ocular toxicity.
Skunk Cabbage: Also known as Skunk Weed, Polecat Weed, Meadow Cabbage or Swamp Cabbage ingestion of this plant can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Spring Parsley: Photosensitization (ulcerative and exudative dermatitis) and ocular toxicity can occur if this plant is ingested.
Superb Lily: Known also as Glory Lily, Climbing Lily or Gloriosa Lily ingestion of this plant can cause salivation, vomiting (bloody), diarrhea (bloody), shock, kidney failure, liver damage, and bone marrow suppression.
Sweet Potato Vine: Also known as Sweet potato, ingestion of this plant can cause diarrhea and hallucinations. Mold damaged plants can cause respiratory distress in livestock.
Tomato Plant: Hypersalivation, inappetence, severe gastrointestinal upset, diarrhea, drowsiness, CNS depression, confusion, behavioral change, weakness, dilated pupils, and slow heart rate can occur if this plant is ingested.
Water Hyacinth: Signs this plant has been ingested include vomiting and anorexia.
Wisteria: Ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting (sometimes with blood), diarrhea, and depression.
Yarrow: Vomiting, diarrhea, depression, anorexia, and hypersalivation can occur if this plant is ingested.
Yellow Oleander: Vomiting, diarrhea, and slow heart rate can occur if this plant is eaten.
Yew: Also known as the Japanese Yew, ingestion of this plant can cause sudden death from acute cardiac failure. Early signs include muscular tremors, dyspnea, and seizures in dogs.
Yucca: Vomiting and diarrhea can occur if this plant is ingested by dogs or cats, while grazing animals can experience liver disease and secondary photosensitivity.


PLANTS TOXIC TO DOGS AND CATS:
Aloe: Signs this plant has been eaten include vomiting, depression, diarrhea, anorexia, tremors, and change in urine color.
Amaryllis: Also known as Belladonna lily, Saint Joseph lily, Cape Belladonna, or Naked Lady, ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, depression, diarrhea, abdominal pain, hypersalivation, anorexia, and tremors.
Andromeda Japonica: Also known as Pieris or Lily-of-the-Valley Bush, ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, depression, cardiovascular collapse, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, low blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse and death. Ingestion of even a few leaves can cause serious problems.
Arrow-Head Vine: Also called Nephthytis, Green Gold Naphthysis, African Evergreen, or Trileaf Wonder, signs of ingestion include oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Arum Lily: Also called Calla Lily, Pig Lily, White Arum, Trumpet Lily, Florist's Calla, or Garden Calla, ingesting this plant can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Australian Ivy Palm: Known also as Schefflera, Umbrella Tree, Octopus Tree, or Starleaf, ingestion of this plant can cause mild vomiting and diarrhea.
Australian Pine: Also called Norfolk Pine, House Pine, or Norfolk Island Pine, signs it has been ingested are vomiting and depression.
Baby Doll Ti Plant: Known also as Ti-Plant, Good-Luck Plant, or Hawaiian Ti Plant, signs of ingestion include vomiting (occasionally with blood), depression, anorexia, hypersalvation and dilated pupils (in cats).
Baby's Breath: Also called Maidens Breath, ingestion of this plant causes vomiting and diarrhea.
Barbados Aloe: Alternatively known as Medicine Plant or True Aloe, ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, and cause urine to turn red.
Barbados Lily: Known also as Amaryllis, Fire Lily, Lily of the Palace, or Ridderstjerne, signs of ingestion include vomiting, salvation, diarrhea; large ingestions cause convulsions, low blood pressure, tremors and cardiac arrhythmias. The bulbs are the most poisonous part of the plant.
Barbados Pride: Also called the Peacock Flower or Dwarf Poinciana, ingestion of this plant causes vomiting and diarrhea.
Barbados Pride 2: Known also as Bird of Paradise, Poinciana, or Brazilwood, ingestion can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, difficulty swallowing and incoordination is possible. Deaths in rabbits have been reported.
Begonia: Ingestion of this plant can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing. Tubers are the most toxic.
Bird of Paradise: Known also as Peacock Flower, Barbados Pride, Poinciana, or Pride of Barbados, ingesting this plant can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, difficulty swallowing and incoordination is possible. Deaths in rabbits have been reported.
Caladium: Also called Malanga, Elephant's Ears, Stoplight, Seagull, Mother-in-law Plant, Pink Cloud, Texas Wonder, Angel-Wings, Exposition, Candidum or Fancy-leaved Caladium, signs of ingestion include oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
California Ivy: Known also as Branching Ivy, Glacier Ivy, Needlepoint Ivy, Sweetheart Ivy, or English Ivy, ingesting this plant can cause vomiting, abdominal pain, hypersalivation, and diarrhea. The foliage is more toxic than the berries.
Calla Lily: Also called Pig Lily, White Arum, Trumpet Lily, Florist's Calla, Garden Calla, or Arum Lily, ingesting this plant can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Carnation: Known also as Pinks, Wild Carnation or Sweet William, ingesting this plant can cause mild gastrointestinal signs and mild dermatitis.
Ceriman: Also known as the Cutleaf Philodendron, Hurricane Plant, Swiss Cheese Plant, or Mexican Breadfruit, ingestion can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Chamomile: Also called Manzanilla, Garden Chamomile, Roman Chamomile, True Chamomile, Corn Feverfew, Barnyard Daisy, Ground-apple or Turkey-weed, signs of ingestion include contact dermatitis, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, and allergic reactions. Long term ingestion can lead to bleeding tendencies.
Chandelier Plant: Also called the Mother-In-Law-Plant, Kalanchoe, Devils Backbone, or Mother of Millions, ingesting this plant can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and abnormal heart rhythm (rare).
Charming Dieffenbachia: Ingestion of this plant can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth , tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Chinese Jade: Also called the Silver Jade Plant or Silver Dollar, ingestion of this plant can cause nausea and retching.
Climbing Lily: Known also as Gloriosa Lily, Glory Lily, Superb Lily signs of ingestion includes alivation, vomiting (bloody), diarrhea (bloody), shock, kidney failure, liver damage, and bone marrow suppression.
Clivia Lily: Also called the Kaffir Lily, Clivies, Caffre Lily, Cape Clivia or Klivia, vomiting, salvation, and diarrhea are all signs this plant has been eaten. Large ingestions can cause convulsions, low blood pressure, tremors and cardiac arrhythmias. Bulbs are the most poisonous part of the plant.
Cordatum: Known also as Fiddle-Leaf, Horsehead Philodendron, Heartleaf Philodendron, Panda Plant, Split Leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Red Emerald, Red Princess or Saddle Leaf, eating this plant can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Corn Plant: Also called the Cornstalk Plant, Dracaena, Dragon Tree or Ribbon Plant, vomiting (occasionally with blood), depression, anorexia, hypersalivation, and dilated pupils (in cats) can occur if it is ingested.
Cutleaf Philodendron: Also called the Hurricane Plant, Swiss Cheese Plant, Ceriman, Mexican Breadfruit, Split-leaf Philodendron or Window Leaf Plant, ingestion of it can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Cyclamen: Also called Sowbread, signs this plant has been ingested include salivation, vomiting, and diarrhea. If a large amount of the tubers are eaten heart rhythm abnormalities, seizures, and death can occur.
Dahlia: Ingestion of this plant can cause mild gastrointestinal signs and mild dermatitis.
Devil's Backbone: Known also as Mother-In-Law-Plant, Kalanchoe, Chandelier Plant, or Mother of Millions, signs it has been ingested include vomiting and diarrhea. Abnormal heart rhythm can occur but is rare.
Devils Ivy: Also called Pothos, Golden Pothos, Taro Vine or Ivy Arum, signs of ingestion include oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Dieffenbachia: Also known as Charming Dieffenbachia, Giant Dumb Cane, Tropic Snow, Dumbcane, Exotica, Spotted Dumb Cane or Exotica Perfection, ingestion of this plant can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth , tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Dracaena: Also called the Corn Plant, Cornstalk Plant, Dragon Tree or Ribbon Plant, its' ingestion can cause vomiting (occasionally with blood), depression, anorexia, hypersalivation, and dilated pupils (in cats).
Eastern Star: This plant is toxic to both dogs and cats.
Feather Geranium: Also called Jerusalem Oak or Ambrosia Mexicana, ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, anorexia, and depression.
Fiddle- Leaf: Also called Horsehead Philodendron, Cordatum, Heartleaf Philodendron, Panda Plant, Split Leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Red Emerald, Red Princess, or Saddle Leaf, signs of ingestion include oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Flag: Also known as Iris, Snake Lily or Water Flag, salivation, vomiting, drooling,lethargy, and diarrhea can occur if it is ingested. The highest concentration of toxins are in the rhizomes.
Flamingo Flower: Also called the Flamingo Lily, Tail Flower, Oilcloth Flower, Pigtail Plant or Painter's Pallet, signs of its' ingestion include oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Florida Beauty: Also known as Gold Dust Dracaena or Spotted Dracaena, it's ingestion can cause dilated pupils, breathing difficulty, abdominal pain, increased heartrate and drooling in cats. In both cats and dogs ingestion can cause vomiting, depression, inappetence, drooling, incoordination, and weakness.
Garden Hyacinth: Also called Hyacinth, signs of its' ingestion include vomiting, diarrhea, dermatitis and allergic reactions. It's bulbs contain the most toxin.
Geranium: Ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, anorexia, depression, and dermatitis.
Giant Dracaena: Known also as Palm Lily or Grass Palm, signs of this plants' ingestion are vomiting (occasionally with blood), depression, anorexia, hypersalivation, and dilated pupils (in cats).
Gold Dieffenbachia: Ingestion of this plant can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of the mouth, lips, tongue, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty in swallowing.
Golden Birds Nest: Known also as Snake Plant, Mother-in-Law’s Tongue or Good Luck Plant, signs of ingestion are nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.
Jade Plant: Also called Baby Jade, Dwarf rubber plant, Jade tree, Chinese rubber plant, and Japanese rubber plant ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting and depression.
Lacy Tree Philodendron: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of the mouth, lips, tongue, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty in swallowing are signs this plant has been ingested.
Lantana: Also called Shrub Verbena, Yellow Sage or Red Sage ingestion can cause vomiting, diarrhea, labored breathing, weakness and liver failure (more common in livestock).
Larkspur: The toxicity of the plant may vary by the amount eaten and the season. As the plant matures it generally becomes less toxic. Signs of ingestion include the neuromuscular paralysisclinical, constipation, colic, increased salivation, muscle tremors, stiffness, weakness, recumbency, and convulsions. Cardiac failure may occur, as can death from respiratory paralysis.
Madagascar Dragon Tree: Vomiting (occasionally with blood), depression, anorexia, hypersalivation, and dilated pupils (in cats) may occur if this plant is ingested.
Mauna Loa Peace Lily: Also called the Peace Lily, ingesting this plant can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Morning Glory: Gastrointestinal upset, agitation, tremors, disorientation, ataxia, anorexia may occur if this plant is ingested. Ingesting the seeds may cause hallucination and diarrhea.
Naked Lady: Vomiting, salvation, and diarrhea can occur if this plant is ingested and large ingestions can cause convulsions, low blood pressure, tremors and cardiac arrhythmias. The bulbs are the most poisonous part of this plant.
Peace Lily: Also known as Mauna Loa Peace Lily, ingestion of this plant can lead to oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Philodendron Pertusum: Ingestion of this plant can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of the mouth, lips, tongue, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.
Poinsettia: This plant is irritating to the mouth and stomach and can cause vomiting if ingested.
Red-Marginated Dracaena: Also known as Straight-marginated dracaena ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, depression, inappetence, drooling, incoordination, and weakness in both dogs and cats. In cats it can also cause dilated pupils, abdominal pain, increased heartrate and drooling.
Satin Pothos: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of the mouth, lips, tongue, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty in swallowing can occur if this plant is ingested.
Striped Dracaena: Known also as Warneckii or janet craig plant vomiting, depression, inappetence, drooling, incoordination, and weakness can occur in dogs and cats if this plant is ingested. Dilated pupils, abdominal pain, increased heartrate and drooling can occur in cats.
Tree Philodendron: Ingestion of this plant can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of the mouth, lips, tongue, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty in swallowing.
Tulip: Ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, depression, diarrhea, and hypersalivation. The most toxic part of this plant is the bulb.
Umbrella Tree: Ingestion of this plant can cause mild vomiting and diarrhea.
Variable Dieffenbachia: Oral irritation, intense burning and irriation of the mouth, lips, tongue, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty in swallowing can result from ingestion of this plant.
Variegated Philodendron: Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of the mouth, lips, tongue, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty in swallowing are signs this plant has been ingested.


PLANTS TOXIC TO CATS:
Asian Lily: Also called the Asiatic Lilly, it's ingestion can cause vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure, and death is possible.
Asparagus Fern: Also known as Asparagus, Emerald Feather, Emerald Fern, Sprengeri Fern, Plumosa Fern, Lace Fern, Racemose Asparagus, or Shatavari, ingesting this plant can cause allergic dermatitis with repeated dermal exposure. Berry ingestion could result in gastric upset (vomiting, abdominal pain, or diarrhea.)
Day Lillies: Ingestion of this plant can cause kidney failure in cats.
Easter Lilly: Ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure, and death in cats.
Japanese Show Lily: If ingested this plant can cause vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure, and possibly death in cats.
Lily: Kidney failure can result from ingesting this plant.
Orange Day Lily: Ingestion of this plant can cause vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure, and possibly death.
Red Lily: Vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure, and possible death can occur if this plant is ingested.
Rubrum Lily: Vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure, and possible death can occur if this plant is ingested.
Stargazer Lily: Vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure and possible death can occur if this plant is ingested.
Tiger Lily: Vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure, and possible death can occur if this plant is ingested.
Wood Lily: Vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure and possible death can occur if this plant is ingested.


PLANTS TOXIC TO DOGS:
Australian Nut: Also known as the Macadamia Nut or Queensland Nut, Ingestion of this plant can result in depression, hyperthermia, weakness, muscular stiffness, vomiting, tremors, and increased heartrate.
Black Walnut: Moldy nuts from this plant can cause tremors and seizures if eaten.
Hops: If ingested this plant can cause panting, high body temperature, seizures, and death.
Wandering Jew: Also known as Speedy Henry or Variegated Wandering Jew, ingestion of this plant can cause dermatitis.


PLANTS TOXIC TO HORSES:
Alsike Clover:
Two distinct syndromes indicate poisoning. The first is "dew poisoning" and is associated with a photosensitivity reaction: sunburn on nonpigmented skin. Affected areas become painful and form ulcerations, and inflammation/ulceration of the mouth and tongue may also occur along with colic and diarrhea, depression or excitation. The second syndrome is associated with recurring bouts of a condition known as "big liver disease" in which animals develop a yellowish discoloration of membranes around the mouth, eyes and nonpigmented areas of skin, accompanied by weight loss, central nervous system depression, loss of appetite, incoordination, dark, discolored urine and a greatly enlarged, fibrotic liver. Just what makes this plant toxic is unknown.
Barnaby's Thistle: Also called the Yellow Star Thistle, this plant usually isn't eaten unless it's incorporated into hay or there is no other forage available. Poisonings occur at ingestions of 50%- 200% of the animal's body weight over a 60 to 90 day period of grazing. Clinical signs have been referred to as "chewing disease", where horses chew but are unable to obtain food or swallow. Other signs include a grinning appearance, open mouth with protruding, lolling tongue, yawning, head tossing, central nervous system depression, lost interest in food, difficulty breathing due to inhalation of food, submerging the head in water in an attempt to drink. Death can occur due to lack of eating and drinking, leading to dehydration and malnutrition.
Black Walnut: Exposure to shavings in bedding and as little as 5% can cause a reaction from this plant. Nuts and nut hulls can also be toxic and cause digestive disturbances. Signs of poisoning can show as early as 8 hours after ingestion and include mild to moderate depression, anorexia, fluid build up in the legs ("stocking up"), laminitis, increased heart and respiratory rate, increased body temperature, and mild colic on occasion.
Blackjack Pine: Also known as Ponderosa Pine, Western Yellow Pine, Yellow Pine, or Bull Pine, this plant is toxic to horses.
Bog Laurel: Also called Pale Laurel or Bog Kalmia, this plant is not typically palatable to horses unless it is the only forage available. The toxic principle interferes with normal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and nerve function. Clinical effects typically occur within a few hours after ingestion, and can include acute digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements/diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate and recumbency for 2 or more days; at this point, improvement may be seen or the animal may become comatose and die.
Bracken Fern: Also called the Brake Fern, Umbewe, Brake, Pasture Bracken, Hog-Pasture Bracken, Eagle fern, Umhlashoshana, or Adelaarsvaring, poisoning most commonly occurs in horses with inadequate forage or when incorporated into hay. All parts of the plant are toxic in both green and dry forms. The toxic component causes a thiamine deficiency and signs of poisoning develop after one to two months of chronic ingestion, and can worsen over a two to three day period. They include weight loss, incoordination/ excessive staggering (known as "bracken staggers"), the developement of a wide stance with arched back, severe muscle tremors, and an inability to get up which could lead to serious injury. Death may occur within one to 2 days of onset if left untreated.
Bull Pine: Known also as Ponderosa Pine, Western Yellow Pine, Yellow Pine, or Blackjack Pine, this plant is toxic to horses.
Carolina Maple: Also called Swamp Maple, Scarlet Maple, Red Maple, Curled Maple, Acer Sanguineum, Soft Maple, or Rufacer Rubrum, wilted leaves are considered to be the most toxic part of the plant. Ingestion of the plant can cause damage to red blood cells, resulting in decreased ability to carry oxygen to tissues; darkening of the membranes around the eyes/mouth,weakness, feed refusal, central nervous system depression, abdominal discomfort, laminitis, discolored urine, and abortion in pregnant mares. Death can occur within 18 hours or as long as 7-10 days after the plant is eaten. Most cases of poisoning are reported during midsummer through early winter.
Catsear: Known also as Flatweed, Cat's Ear or False Dandelion, ingesting this plant can cause stringhalt (back legs may have exaggerated flexion, hopping gait). Charlock: Also called Wild Mustard or California Rape, poisonings are not typical unless other forage is unavailable or the plant is in the hay and usually occur from the first and sometimes second cuttings of hay. Exposure can cause digestive tract irritation.
Fiddleneck: Although not very palatable it can be eaten in hay mixed with green plant material or if no other forage is available. It's ingestion can cause liver failure, weight loss, weakness, sleepiness, yawning, incoordination, yellowish discoloration to mucous membranes (icterus) and neurologic problems secondary to liver failure (aimless walking, chewing motions, head pressing). Animals may appear to be normal at first, then become suddenly affected. The syndrome will progress rapidly over a few days to a week.
Field Horsetail: Also called Scouring rush, Common horsetail or Western horsetail, this plant is usually eaten when very little suitable vegetation is available for grazing. Ingestion over several days or weeks can result in thiamine break down, weight loss, central nervous system disorders, muscle weakness gradually progressing in severity, convulsions and death.
Field Pennycress: Although not typically ingested unless other forage is unavailable or it is incorporated into hay, poisioning mostly occur from the first and sometimes second hay cuttings and can cause digestive tract irritation.
Goatweed: The adult plant is not very palatable but can be ingested if suitable forage is not available while the young plant is attractive and can be grazed abundantly. Ingestion can cause a chemically induced sunburn (usually within 24 hours after ingestion and on light, unpigmented areas of skin), dermatitis, itching and ulceration of the skin leading to skin damage.
Heliotrope: Although not very palatable it can be eaten in hay with green plant material or where there is no other forage and can cause liver failure, referred to as "walking disease" or "sleepy staggers", weight loss, weakness, sleepiness, yawning, incoordination, yellowish discoloration to mucous membranes (icterus), and neurologic problems secondary to liver failure (aimless walking, chewing motions, head pressing). Animals may appear to be normal at first, then become suddenly affected. The syndrome will progress rapidly over a few days to a week.
Hoary Alyssum: Poisonings can occur from ingesting the dried plant in hay, or from grazing on large amounts of the plant in fields. Signs of ingestion generally occur after a day to a few days after it's been eaten and include fever, swollen limbs, colic, bloody diarrhea, laminitis, premature births, loss of appetite, dehydration and death. Deaths are usually associated with the consumption of hay containing 30 to 70% of plant.
Hound's Tongue: The plant is not very palatable, but will be eaten by animals with no other forage or when the green plant material is present in hay. Ingestion can cause liver failure, referred to as "walking disease" or "sleepy staggers", weight loss, weakness, sleepiness, yawning, incoordination, yellowish discoloration to mucous membranes (icterus), and neurologic problems secondary to liver failure (aimless walking, chewing motions, head pressing). Animals may appear to be normal at first, then become suddenly affected. The syndrome progresses rapidly over a few days to a week.
Jimmy Weed: Also called Burrow Weed, this plant is toxic all year, though most poisonings occur in summer and late fall. Eating one to ten percent of their body weight in this plant can cause incoordination, muscle weakness and tremors, elevated heart rate, cardiac arrhythmias, fluid accumulation, swelling of the nervous system, profuse sweating and an inability to swallow. Signs of ingestion generally occur after two days to three weeks.
Lambkill: Known also as Sheep Laurel this plant is typically not palatable to horses unless it is the only available forage. Ingestion of it can interfere with normal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and nerve function which can cause acute digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements or diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate and recumbency for two or more days at which point improvement may be seen or coma and death can occur.
Larkspur: Unless there is a lack of suitable forage, horses typically do not consume toxic amounts of larkspur and the toxicity of the plant may vary depending on seasonal changes and field conditions. As the plant matures it generally becomes less toxic. Signs of ingestion include the neuromuscular paralysisclinical, constipation, colic, increased salivation, muscle tremors, stiffness, weakness, recumbency, and convulsions. Cardiac failure may occur, as can death from respiratory paralysis.
Loco Weed: Though not very palatable this plant is usually eaten by animals with no other forage. Animals can become addicted to the plant and refuse to consume anything else. If more than 30% of the animal's body weight is ingested over a period of six or more weeks, the brain can be effected causing a loss of sensory and motor nerve function, central nervous system depression, progressive loss of coordination, inability to eat and drink, as well as fetal death and birth defects. Animals who are affected may become excessively excitable and wild when stimulated and may also become unaware of their surroundings.
Locust: Toxicity occurs from grazing young sprouts, ingesting bark or pruned or fallen branches. Signs of ingestionmay develop one to two hours later and include loss of appetite, depression, stupor, weakness with rear end paralysis, laminitis, coldness of the extremities, dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, weak, irregular pulse, and diarrhea (which may be bloody). Primary damage is done to the gastrointestinal tract and long term effects can include chronic laminitis.
Mountain Laurel: Typically not very palatable to horses unless it is the only forage available, the main toxin of this plant interferes with normal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and nerve function. Signs of ingestion usually occur within a few hours after the plant has been eaten and can cause acute digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements or diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate and recumbency for two days or more at which point improvement may bee seen or the animal may become comatose and die.
Oak: Poisonings can occur when horses graze on oak when there is a lack of adequate forage. Abdominal pain, constipation which can be followed by diarrhea (occasionally bloody), depression, frequent urination or discolored urine and jaundice are possible.
Oleander: Poisonings can occur from acess to prunings or fallen branches, or ornamentals around horse show areas. All parts of the plant are highly toxic and if ingested can caused colic, diarrhea (possibly bloody), sweating, incoordination, shallow/difficult breathing, muscle tremors, recumbency, and possibly death from cardiac failure.
Pale Laurel: Although not very palatable to horses it can be ingested if it is the only forage available. The toxins in this plant interfere with normal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and nerve function. Sings it has been ingested typically occur within a few hours after ingestion and include acute digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements or diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate and recumbency for 2 or more days. At this point, improvement may be seen or the animal may become comatose and die.
Patterson's Curse: Also known as Viper's Bugloss, this plant is not very palatable to horsesbut will be eaten when no other forage is available or when green plant material is incorporated into hay. Ingestion can cause liver failure, referred to as "walking disease" or "sleepy staggers", weight loss, weakness, sleepiness, yawning, incoordination, yellowish discoloration to mucous membranes (icterus), neurologic problems secondary to liver failure (aimless walking, chewing motions, head pressing). Animals may appear to be normal at first, then become suddenly affected. The syndrome will progress rapidly over a few days to a week.
Rattlebox: Although not very palatable, this plant will be eaten when there is no other forage or if green plant material is present in hay. Ingestion of this plant can cause liver failure, referred to as "walking disease" or "sleepy staggers", weight loss, weakness, sleepiness, yawning, incoordination, yellowish discoloration to mucous membranes (icterus), and neurologic problems secondary to liver failure (aimless walking, chewing motions, head pressing). Animals may appear to be normal at first, then become suddenly affected with the syndrome progressing rapidly over a few days to a week.
Rayless Goldenrod: Toxic year round, although most poisonings occur in summer and late fall, a horse can develop lethal effects if one to ten percent of their body weight is eaten. Signs usualy occur after two days to three weeks and include incoordination, muscle weakness and tremors, elevated heart rate, cardiac arrhythmias, fluid accumulation and swelling of the nervous system, profuse sweating, and an inability to swallow.
Red Maple: Also called Swamp Maple, Scarlet Maple, Curled Maple or Soft Maple, ingestion of this plant damages red blood cells resulting in a decreased ability to carry oxygen to tissues, darkening of the membranes around the eyes and mouth, weakness, feed refusal, central nervous system depression, abdominal discomfort, laminitis, discolored urine, and abortion in pregnant mares. Death can occur within 18 hours or as long as 7-10 days after ingestion. Most cases of poisoning are reported during midsummer through early winter.
Russian Knapweed: This plant is not usually eaten unless other forage is unavailable or when incorporated into hay. Poisonings occur at ingestions of 50%- 200% of the animal's body weight over a 60 to 90 day period of grazing. Signs of ingestion include "chewing disease", where horses chew but are unable to obtain food or swallow. Other signs are a grinning appearance, open mouth with protruding, lolling tongue, yawning, head tossing, central nervous system depression, lost interest in food, difficulty breathing due to inhalation of food, and submerging the head in water in an attempt to drink. Due to a lack of eating and drinking, dehydration and malnutrition can occur and lead to death.
Sudan Grass: Poisonings typically occur during periods of high rainfall and after grazing on the young green plants for periods of one week to six months, with an average of 8 weeks. Signs of ingestion include loss of nerve function to the hind legs and bladder, stumbling when forced to move, progressing to complete paralysis of the hind limbs, inability to go backwards (back up), and bladder paralysis which can result in over filling and constant dribbling of urine. This can lead to scalding of the hind legs in mares and/or bladder infection. Poisonings may also cuase fetal deformities or fetal death.
White Snakeroot: Known also as fall poison, richweed or tremetol this plant is toxic year round, although poisonings usually occur in summer and late fall. Horses eating one to ten percent of their body weight in the plant can develop lethal clinical effects with signs generally occuring after two days to three weeks of ingestion, and including incoordination, muscle weakness and tremors, elevated heart rate, cardiac arrhythmias, profuse sweating, and inability to swallow. Nursing foals can develop signs of poisioning as well and the toxin is passed in their milk.
White/Black/Yellow Indian Mustard: This plant is not typically ingested unless other forage is unavailable or the plant is incorporated into hay. Poisonings occur most commonly from first and sometimes second cuttings of hay and can cause digestive tract irritation.
Wild Radish: Ingestion of this plant can cause digestive tract irritation. Poisonings occur most commonly from first and sometimes second cuttings, though the plant is not usually ingested unless incorporated into hay or if other foliage is lacking.
Wintercress: Ingestion of this plant can cause digestive tract irritation. Poisonings occur most commonly from first and sometimes second cuttings, though the plant is not usually ingested unless incorporated into hay or if other foliage is lacking.
Wormseed Mustard: Ingestion of this plant can cause digestive tract irritation. Poisonings occur most commonly from first and sometimes second cuttings, though the plant is not usually ingested unless incorporated into hay or if other foliage is lacking.
Yellow Starthistle: This plant is not usually eaten unless other forage is unavailable or when it is incorporated into hay. Poisonings occur at ingestions of 50%- 200% of the animal's body weight over a 60 to 90 day period of grazing. signs of ingestion include "chewing disease", where horses chew but are unable to obtain food or swallow, a grinning appearance, open mouth with protruding, lolling tongue, yawning, head tossing, central nervous system depression, lost interest in food, difficulty breathing due to inhalation of food, and submerging the head in water in an attempt to drink. Death can occur due to lack of eating and drinking, leading to dehydration and malnutrition.
Yellowrocket: Ingestion of this plant can cause digestive tract irritation. Poisonings occur most commonly from first and sometimes second cuttings, though the plant is not usually ingested unless incorporated into hay or if other foliage is lacking.


PLANTS TOXIC TO CATTLE:
Avocado:
This plant, also called the Alligator Pear can cause inflammation of the mammary glands and a decreased milk production if ingested.
Blackjack Pine: Also known as Ponderosa Pine, Western Yellow Pine, Yellow Pine, or Bull Pine, ingesting this plant can cause premature birth of calves or miscarriage in cattle.
Bull Pine: Known also as Ponderosa Pine, Western Yellow Pine, Yellow Pine, or Blackjack Pine, ingestion can cause premature birth of calves and miscarriage.
Day Lillies: Ingestion of this plant can cause incoordination, paresis, blindness, and death in cows.


PLANTS TOXIC TO GOATS:
Avocado: This plant, also called the Alligator Pear can cause inflammation of the mammary glands, decreased milk production, difficulty breathing, fluid around heart, heart rhythm problems, and death if ingested.
Azalea: Also called Rosebay or Rhododendron, even the ingestion of a few leaves of this plant can cause serious problems such as vomiting, diarrhea, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, hypotension, CNS depression, cardiovascular collapse and death. Goats and sheep may graze readily on it. The main toxin found in the plant interferes with normal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and nerve function. Effects typically occur within a few hours after ingestion, and can include acute digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements/diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate and recumbency for 2 or more days; at this point, improvement may be seen or the animal may become comatose and die.
Bog Laurel: Also called Pale Laurel or Bog Kalmia, the main toxin of the plant interferes with normal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and nerve function. Clinical effects typically occur within a few hours after ingestion, and can include acute digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements/diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate and recumbency for 2 or more days; at this point, improvement may be seen or the animal may become comatose and die.
Lambkill: Known also as Sheep Laurel this plant is eagerly grazed upon by goats. Ingestion of it can interfere with normal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and nerve function which can cause acute digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements or diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate and recumbency for two or more days at which point improvement may be seen or coma and death can occur.
Mountain Laurel: Readily grazed upon by goats, the main toxin of this plant interferes with normal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and nerve function. Signs of ingestion usually occur within a few hours after the plant has been eaten and can cause acute digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements or diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate and recumbency for two days or more at which point improvement may bee seen or the animal may become comatose and die.
Pale Laurel: Goats will readily graze on this plant whose toxins interfere with normal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and nerve function. Sings it has been ingested typically occur within a few hours after ingestion and include acute digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements or diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate and recumbency for 2 or more days. At this point, improvement may be seen or the animal may become comatose and die.


PLANTS TOXIC TO SHEEP:
Azalea: Also called Rosebay or Rhododendron, even the ingestion of a few leaves of this plant can cause serious problems such as vomiting, diarrhea, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, hypotension, CNS depression, cardiovascular collapse and death. Sheep and goats may graze readily on it. The main toxin found in the plant interferes with normal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and nerve function. Effects typically occur within a few hours after ingestion, and can include acute digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements/diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate and recumbency for 2 or more days; at this point, improvement may be seen or the animal may become comatose and die.
Bog Laurel: Also called Pale Laurel or Bog Kalmia, the main toxin in the plant interferes with normal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and nerve function. Clinical effects typically occur within a few hours after ingestion, and can include acute digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements/diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate and recumbency for 2 or more days; at this point, improvement may be seen or the animal may become comatose and die.
Lambkill: Known also as Sheep Laurel this plant is readily grazed upon by sheep. Ingestion of it can interfere with normal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and nerve function which can cause acute digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements or diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate and recumbency for two or more days at which point improvement may be seen or coma and death can occur.
Mountain Laurel: Readily grazed upon by sheep, the main toxin of this plant interferes with normal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and nerve function. Signs of ingestion usually occur within a few hours after the plant has been eaten and can cause acute digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements or diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate and recumbency for two days or more at which point improvement may bee seen or the animal may become comatose and die.
Pale Laurel: Sheep will readily graze on this plant whose toxins interfere with normal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and nerve function. Sings it has been ingested typically occur within a few hours after ingestion and include acute digestive upset, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, frequent bowel movements or diarrhea, colic, depression, weakness, loss of coordination, stupor, leg paralysis, weak heart rate and recumbency for 2 or more days. At this point, improvement may be seen or the animal may become comatose and die.


PLANTS TOXIC TO RABBITS:
Avocado:
This plant, also called the Alligator Pear can cause inflammation of the mammary glands, decreased milk production, difficulty breathing, fluid around heart, heart rhythm problems, and death if eaten.
Bird of Paradise: Known also as Peacock Flower, Barbados Pride, Poinciana, or Pride of Barbados, it's ingestion can cause death in rabbits.


PLANTS TOXIC TO BIRDS:
Avocado:
This plant, also called the Alligator Pear can cause difficulty breathing, fluid around heart, heart rhythm problems, and death if eaten.

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